Feedback for Parks & Recreation

Overseeing and maintaining every Park and Recreation location in any city can be overwhelming. Layer the difficulty of staffing during these times on top, and it can feel insurmountable. Cities usually post a number to call if there’s an issue, but the public is unlikely to reach out about concerns that aren’t emergencies. Overflowing trashcans, stopped-up toilets, a broken basketball rim, and other inconveniences can persist, projecting a poor image for the city.

By the Numbers

Only 10% of counties have after-hours contact available for assistance that is non-emergency related. Municipalities have no way of easily getting critical information from their citizens.

Maintenance issues that go unresolved cost municipalities up to 300% more rather than resolving them as they happen.

Emergency rooms treat over 200,000 kids under 14 for playground injuries each year. Poorly maintained equipment and dangerous conditions can result in serious harm.

97% of Parks and Rec department’s main tools for receiving input from residents are through surveys, phone calls, and virtual or in-person meetings.

Watch the Feedback for Parks & Rec Explainer Video

Example Feedbacks

The men’s restrooms by the RV campground are out of toilet paper.

The trash cans are overflowing and need changing.

There’s a busted sprinkler head next to the entrance that needs attention.

Someone left their car keys on Hole 18 near the parking lot by the golf course.

There’s broken glass next to the picnic tables on the south side.

I’m shooting hoops with my son at the court, and the lights just went out.

There’s a snake that just wandered out of Beaver Lake. It looks mean.

Someone is walking around the park blaring loud music. Can we fix this?

Employees can use Feedback to alert management of issues and even remain anonymous

This is Jim from Grounds. There’s black ice in the left lot by tennis courts.

I saw Bob, one of our park rangers smoking pot before walking into his cabin.